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Full text of "NightRider"

They were silent for a while as the carriage moved over
the hard ruts of the lane. On each side was a grove of bare
trees, with dry underbrush choking the space between the
trunks and coming almost up to the first branches. When
the lane turned sharply and came out of the grove, so that
the view gave again on the open country, they saw the house
sitting at the head of a long rise, an enormous house of red
brick, with symmetrical wings and white columns, flanked
by masses of tall, black cedars. White fences bordered the
lane that led up to the house. On the long rise toward the
house the few black, leafless trees seemed arbitrary and un-
natural, their boles sticking up from the colourless earth. At
that distance the house, set against the background of the
ridges that defined the horizon, and dominating the slope of
the lane and the wide fields and pastures, was blank and
lonely and severe.

" There it is," Mr, Munn said.

"Yassuh," the negro put in, "dar hit."

The house was not old. The Senator had built it fifteen
years before on the site of the old house, which had burned.
He always said that he had built it as much like the old one
as possible; and he usually added, "Only, of course, some-
what larger." It was much larger than the old one had
been. The central section, though much deeper, did re-
semble the old house, which had been a ten-room brick farm-
house with a high, white portico. But few people now could
remember what the old place had looked like; and people
by now had forgotten to say, when remarking on the new
house, that Senator Tolliver had built it with his wife's money,
and that she had a lot but it wouldn't last for ever*

Senator Tolliver did build the house with his wife's money,
far he had little of his own. He came of a good, moderately
wealthy family, which had been ruined in the Civil War by
the father's almost fanatical devotion to the Southern cause,
Old Mr. Tolliver had outfitted half a company of cavalry,
and had strained all of his resources to buy Confederate
bonds. He was reported missing after the battle of Franklin.